Three Octave Minor Scale

This has got to be one of the most difficult three octave minor scale patterns I have ever played. I must say its like the baseball player swinging three bats at once to warm up. When he goes to just one bat it feels so much lighter. This is how this pattern is. The difficulty is so great that once you go back to your regular playing, your fingers will fly across the frets.

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Just as in my Major pattern, you have four notes per string from the 6th string through the 3rd string. In order to achieve this you have to do some pretty crazy streching in the left hand.

Start with the A on the E string with your first finger then slide up to 7th position to play the B,C and D notes. Next, play the E on the A string with the first finger and quickly slide up to the F and pick that note. At this point you are in 8th position (expanded) on the A string and you continue by playing the G and A notes on the A string. I say "expanded" because you are covering five frets instead of four.

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Next is a very difficult move. You have to travel 6 frets on the G string. I just do this by sliding from the F to the G note with the first finger ending up in expanded 12th position. Then you jump to 13th position on the B and E strings.

Lastly, on the high E string you are going to slide again on the first finger to get up to the B note. Going back down is very treacherous. Sliding with the first finger is the key to getting the four notes per string.

Of course, you want to develop patterns for Augmented, Diminished, Locrian, Dorian, and everything else under the sun. So you are going to have to map them out one by one and find the most efficient way to travel up the fretboard like a rocket train. My examples will give you a roadmap of how to do this.

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